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How does that work? The Graduate School, and Sociology Department, are committed to ensuring all PhD students are financially supported during their education, through a combination of institutional and external funds, for the majority of the time they are registered and working toward their degree.As part of this, nearly all admitted students are offered a funding package from The Graduate School.The Graduate School funding package consists of 5 full years (20 quarters) of stipend, tuition scholarships and a health insurance subsidy Frequently Asked Questions. Applications are due January 15. Applications are considered for Fall admission only. CLICK HERE to apply. Thinking about Sociology at UT? We take graduate student recruitment very seriously and we assume you take applying to graduate school equally seriously. Here are a few questions  .The Graduate School funding package consists of 5 full years (20 quarters) of stipend, tuition scholarships and a health insurance subsidy.

Students are strongly encouraged to apply for external funding during their first 5 years, which can extend this funding up to 1 additional year (see TGS External Award Policy).

Some of our entering students have received fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the Diversifying Faculty in Higher Education Fellowship, the Jacob K.Javits Program, the American Sociological Association, or the Ford Foundation, to name a few.Minority students should either contact or peruse the website of The Graduate School's office of Diversity and Inclusion for funding opportunities.I'm interested in getting a Master's … We do not offer a terminal Master’s Degree program.

I’m interested in an online, or part time program… We do not offer an online, or part time program, this is a full time PhD program that requires residency at Northwestern University.

I would like a tour or to meet with an admissions officer… Due to the high volume of applicants we do not offer tours, or meetings with admission officers, prior to admittance to our program.All admitted students are invited to a two day open house where they will meet with faculty and graduate students, visit the campus and see Evanston/Chicago before the April 15 th decision deadline.Applicants with questions should email [email protected] , and your question will be answered or forwarded to the appropriate person.Can I apply to start in the winter or spring? No.All applications must be for fall admission.

The application deadline is December 15 of the preceding year.I have an MA already does the department accept transfer credit? Yes, on a case by case basis and only after a student is admitted to the program will we assess if a course can count for particular requirement.Students can have a maximum of 6 courses waived from prior graduate level coursework and are still required to fulfill the TGS residency requirement.I was an econ (English, French, biology, et.We look for talent, intellectual curiosity and a passion for research, not for a specific type of training.Our cohorts traditionally have diverse academic backgrounds.What they share are current research interests that can be addressed with sociological theories and methods.

I am interested in (fill in the blank) Are any faculty studying that? Please review the list of faculty interests on our website.In general, the Department’s strengths include sociology of culture, social organization, urban sociology, sociology of law/criminology, social inequalities of all sorts (class, gender, race, sexualities, ethnicity, religion, etc.), and comparative-historical sociology, as explained on the website.Can I pursue those interests while obtaining my Sociology PhD? We encourage interdisciplinary work.

For some (but not all) areas, this takes place via the Graduate School’s graduate cluster program.For others, it involves working with faculty in different departments and/or affiliating with various centers around campus.How long does the program typically take? The Graduate School requires doctoral students to be admitted to candidacy prior to the beginning of the student's fourth year, and to complete the PhD in nine years.Many students complete the PhD in 6 years, but some take an additional 2 to 3 years.Frequently asked questions after application has been submitted I took the GRE/TOEFL test on November 15th, or later, and my official scores aren’t ready to be sent to the TGS, what happens? Your application is considered incomplete and will not be reviewed until these official scores arrive.

We strongly encourage applicants to take these tests before November 1 st to avoid any issues with test scores arriving by the December 15 th deadline.One of my recommenders told me that they didn’t have to submit their letter of recommendation by the December 15th deadline, is this true? No, your entire application, with all required material, must be received by the December 15 th deadline.Due to the high volume of applications, the review process begins shortly after the deadline.Any materials received after December 15 th, may not be reviewed by the admission committee.When will the department have a decision on my application? Admission decisions are usually announced in mid to late February.

You can check the status of your application via your Activity Page using the same Username and Password you used to create your online ants with questions should email [email protected] , and your question will be answered or forwarded to the appropriate person.© 2017 Northwestern University About the Program The graduate program in Sociology is devoted to the training of research scholars and educators in the discipline.Students have a variety of career goals, ranging from academic research and teaching to research and administration in private or public agencies.The doctoral program provides advanced training in sociological theory, statistics, and research methods.The program's main areas of graduate teaching and research are Gender and Sexuality, Immigration and Globalization, Medical Sociology, Race and Ethnicity, and Urban Sociology.

Time Limit for Degree Completion: 7 years Campus Location: Main Full-Time/Part-Time Status: Full-time study is preferred, but part-time enrollment can be considered on a case-by-case basis.Interdisciplinary Study: The program encourages students to participate in seminars in other social sciences, including Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Geography and Urban Studies, History, Political Science, Psychology, Urban Education, and Women’s Studies.Affiliation(s): The program is affiliated with the American Sociological Association (ASA).Areas of Specialization: The main areas of graduate teaching and research are: Gender and Sexuality Urban Sociology Job Prospects: Graduates of the Ph.program are typically employed as either teaching-research scholars in an academic setting or as applied researchers and administrators in private and public agencies.Non-Matriculated Student Policy: Students with a bachelor's degree may take graduate courses in Sociology without enrolling in a Temple University graduate program.A limit of 9 credits of graduate coursework taken prior to admission will be accepted toward a Sociology degree.Non-matriculated students should consult with the Graduate Chair before selecting their coursework if they plan to apply for the degree program.Financing Opportunities: The Sociology Department and Temple University support full-time students during the academic year through Teaching Assistantships, part-time teaching, and University and Future Faculty Fellowships.

Initial funding is contingent on the recommendation of the Admissions Committee; continued funding is based on faculty assessment at the annual graduate student review.Funded students are typically offered a four-year funding package.Additional support for dissertation research is available through fellowships competitively awarded by the university and from outside sources.Admission Requirements and Deadlines Number Required: 3 From Whom: Letters of recommendation should be obtained from college/university faculty members familiar with academic competence, wherever possible.

Master's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A master's degree is not required.

Bachelor's Degree in Discipline/Related Discipline: A baccalaureate degree in Sociology, Criminal Justice, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, or Urban Studies is required, although a degree in other disciplines can be considered.Statement of Goals: Approximately 500 to 1,000 words include your interest in Temple's program; your research goals; your future career goals; and your academic and research achievements.Standardized Test Scores: TOEFL: 100 iBT or 600 PBT minimum Writing Sample: The writing sample should demonstrate your ability to conduct research and write a scholarly paper.The paper should be on a sociological topic, and no more than 25 pages in length.It must be fully referenced according to a professional and scholarly style.

Resume: Current personal resume or curriculum vitae required.Transfer Credit: Graduate coursework in Sociology may be transferred from outside the university, provided that the credits were obtained no more than five years prior to the student's matriculation at Temple and the grades are "B" or better.The maximum number of credits a student may transfer is 12, if the credits earned did not result in the completion of an M.Advanced Standing: For students entering the Ph.degree elsewhere, up to 19 credits may be applied to the doctoral program, provided the courses are relevant to the department's required courses.

These credits must have been obtained no more than five years prior to the student's matriculation at Temple and the grades must be "B" or better.The Graduate Chair decides which courses students may transfer.As a general rule, students with transferred credits should expect that they will have to complete much of the required coursework in residence and are, further, expected to take two courses from Temple faculty in their area of focus before taking the Ph.Program Requirements 1 Of the eight elective courses, two must relate to the preliminary examination.Other electives may include: Independent Study courses (SOC 9382): With the consent of the Graduate Chair and the instructor, students may take two Independent Study courses, which are intensive programs of study within a specific area of Sociology.Students who wish to take these courses must submit to the Graduate Chair at the beginning of the term a "Department Independent Study Request" form describing the readings and/or research they propose to undertake.The form must be signed by both the participating faculty member and the Graduate Chair.A final statement on the work completed must be filed with the Graduate Chair at the end of the term.

Letter grades are given for these courses.Outside courses: With the approval of the Graduate Chair, students may take two courses outside the Sociology Department.2 In lieu of SOC 9998, an additional credit may be taken in either SOC 9994 or SOC 9999.

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Culminating Events: Pre-Candidacy Evaluation: The Sociology Department evaluates doctoral students at the end of their second year using the grade point average (GPA) as a main criterion for advancement to doctoral-level coursework.4 is ordinarily not allowed to continue in the doctoral program.However, the student can petition the Graduate Committee for re-consideration Frequently Asked Questions Department of Sociology Northwestern nbsp.However, the student can petition the Graduate Committee for re-consideration.

After a petition is submitted, the Graduate Chair requires a written evaluation from each faculty member in the department with whom the student has taken a course.The student is permitted to continue in the Ph Order a coursework sociology Proofreading CBE US Letter Size Platinum.The student is permitted to continue in the Ph.program if at least five faculty members write in support of the petition.Those not allowed to continue can graduate with an M how to buy anthropology report British 137 pages / 37675 words Writing.Those not allowed to continue can graduate with an M.Preliminary Examination: After completing the required coursework, doctoral students are expected to take a preliminary examination in the Spring term of their third year nbd-dhofar.com/report/how-to-buy-anthropology-report-british-137-pages-37675-words-writing-plagiarism-free.

Preliminary Examination: After completing the required coursework, doctoral students are expected to take a preliminary examination in the Spring term of their third year.

The preliminary examination consists of two parts: the written area examination, and the proposal paper.Based on the written area exam grade and the evaluation of the proposal paper, the Graduate Chair assigns an overall “pass” or “fail” to each student for the preliminary examination.Students are notified of the results at the end of the term.Students need a “pass” on the written exam and an “acceptable” evaluation on the proposal paper to successfully complete the preliminary examination.Those who do well on one part but fail the other may retake the part they failed.

Those who fail both the area exam and the proposal paper are allowed to retake both parts.Students who fail on their second attempt at either the written area exam or the proposal paper are not allowed to continue in the Ph.program but are eligible to receive a master’s degree.

Written Area Exam: Prior to taking the preliminary examination, students must complete two or more graduate-level courses related to that examination area offered by the faculty within the department.

When doctoral students complete the required coursework, they must then take the preliminary examination in one of the broad examination areas identified by the Sociology Department as consistent with its mission and self-defined areas of strength: Gender and Sexuality, Immigration and Globalization, Medical Sociology, Race and Ethnicity, and Urban Sociology.However, students may request to take the exam in another area under the following conditions: the student has taken at least two graduate-level courses in the Sociology Department in the requested area, one of which may be an independent study course;two faculty members are willing to sponsor the exam; andthe Graduate Chair approves.No later than the second Monday in September prior to the Spring term when the preliminary examination will be taken, students must fill out the "Department Preliminary Examination Application" form and indicate the selected area for the exam.At the beginning of the Fall term, two faculty members from the prelim area are appointed by the Department Chair to form a Prelim Committee, which consists of a chair and one regular member.The committee members are charged with: updating the integrated prelim reading list for the area;writing and submitting four prelim questions to the Graduate Chair by March 15; andgrading the exams.

The Department Chair also appoints a tiebreaker to read the exam if the committee does not agree on the evaluation.The written area examination consists of four questions, and students must select and answer two of those questions.Students are given one week to complete the preliminary exam.Students receive the questions the second Monday in April, and the answers are due the third Monday in April.The Prelim Committee members have two weeks to evaluate the exam, assigning a grade of “Pass” or “Fail” to each question along with their comments.

A total of at least three “Pass” grades from the two graders is needed for a student to pass the exam.When the graders both agree to fail a question (even if they pass the other question), the student has failed the preliminary exam.The tiebreaker should be used either when: one grader passes both answers and the other grader fails both answers; orwhen one grader passes the first answer and fails the second, while the other grader fails the first answer and passes the second.If the tiebreaker fails to break the tie (i., three fails and three passes), the student fails the exam.Grades with comments are submitted to the Graduate Chair.If the student fails the written area exam, s/he may retake the exam.At the beginning of the following Fall term, three faculty members (including a tiebreaker) in the prelim area are appointed by the Department Chair to form a Prelim Committee.The committee submits four questions to the Graduate Chair by October 15.

The student receives the questions the Monday of the week before Thanksgiving week and the exam is due on the Monday of Thanksgiving week.The committee has two weeks to grade the exam.Proposal Paper: In the Spring term of the preliminary examination, students are also required to take a three-credit proposal seminar course (SOC 9994 Preliminary Examination Preparation).They must receive a passing grade on the written paper for the course in order to pass the preliminary examination.The proposal paper is the main assignment of the proposal seminar.

Every student selects a faculty member with expertise in her/his research area to serve as a proposal reader.The proposal reader meets with the student at least twice during the term to discuss the paper: once before Spring break, and once after Spring break.At the end of each meeting, the reader provides the student and the instructor of the proposal seminar course with a brief narrative of the strengths and weaknesses of the paper.The instructor may meet with the reader to discuss the student’s progress in the writing of the proposal paper.The week after Spring break, the instructor submits a report to the Graduate Chair with a brief description of the performance of each student.

Any student who is underperforming is called to a meeting with the Graduate Chair in the presence of the instructor and the proposal reader to take corrective measures.On the official last day of classes, students submit their proposal paper to the instructor and the reader.The paper should demonstrate mastery of the existing body of literature on the proposed topic and the ability to formulate important scholarly research problems, as well as the appropriate methods to investigate them.It should not exceed 20 pages and should have no fewer than 12 pages.The evaluation of the proposal paper focuses on the student’s potential for writing a passable dissertation.

Evidence of such potential includes the ability to synthesize the relevant literature; conceptualize a researchable problem; and propose a feasible research design.The instructor and the reader have a week to grade the papers.Each must submit a detailed, descriptive evaluation of the paper to the Graduate Chair, indicating whether it is “acceptable” or “unacceptable.” If the instructor and the reader disagree on the evaluation of the paper, a third department member with expertise in the area is appointed by the Graduate Chair to provide a determining evaluation.The main goal of the paper evaluation is to assess the student’s ability to write a dissertation.

If the student fails the proposal paper, s/he may rewrite the paper.The Graduate Chair appoints a faculty mentor with expertise in the research topic to work with the student on the rewriting of the paper; the mentor also serves as a grader.The Graduate Chair appoints another faculty member to serve as a second grader.If a tie occurs between the two graders, the Graduate Chair finds a third grader to break the tie.The rewritten paper is due the first Monday in December.

The appointed faculty members evaluate the paper and report to the Graduate Chair in two weeks whether the paper is “acceptable” or “unacceptable.” Students are notified of the results by December 15.Doctoral Advisory Committee: Following the preliminary examination, the student selects the Chair of her/his Doctoral Advisory Committee.The remaining two or more members of the committee are selected by the student in consultation with the Chair.

The majority of the committee members must be from the Sociology Department.

Other members may include faculty from other departments within Temple University or from other universities; doctoral-level expert advisors from outside university settings may also be considered as members.To establish the Doctoral Advisory Committee, the student must submit a "Sociology Department Doctoral Advisory Committee" form to the department's Graduate Coordinator.To include committee members who are not members of the Temple Graduate Faculty on a Doctoral Advisory Committee, the Chair must request approval by submitting the "Nomination for Service on Doctoral Committee" form, found at/grad/forms/, and the proposed committee member’s current curriculum vitae to the Graduate School.If a change is made in the composition of the Doctoral Advisory Committee, the change must be approved by the Chair of the committee; if the change involves the Chair of the committee, the Graduate Chair should be informed beforehand and the original Chair of the committee must be notified.The change must also be noted on the original "Sociology Department Doctoral Advisory Committee" form and signed by both the Chair of the committee and the Graduate Chair.

The Doctoral Advisory Committee meets at least once a year to review the candidate's progress and offer advice to the candidate.Dissertation Proposal: The dissertation proposal is a brief statement of the dissertation research.It should contain a review of the literature; a statement of the research problem; and a comprehensive description of the research strategy to be employed.The student distributes a proposal summary of five pages or less to all department faculty members at least two weeks prior to the oral defense of the proposal.

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One complete copy of the proposal should also be available in the office of the department's Graduate Coordinator.

All department faculty and graduate students are invited to attend the presentation of the dissertation proposal.Normally, proposal defenses are held during the academic year Ph D Program in Sociology Sociology Brown University.Normally, proposal defenses are held during the academic year.

All members of the committee must be present at the proposal defense, but an alternate member may be requested with prior approval from the Graduate Chair.The dissertation proposal is accepted only when members of the dissertation committee vote unanimously to accept it.An approved dissertation proposal along with the "Dissertation Proposal Transmittal for Elevation to Candidacy" form, found at/grad/forms/, must be filed with the Graduate School.

After defending the dissertation proposal, a student is formally advanced to Ph.If a change is made in the composition of the Doctoral Advisory Committee after the approval of the proposal, the change must be approved by the Chair of the committee and the Dean of the College should i buy a computer science lab report A4 (British/European) Writing from scratch 1 hour.If a change is made in the composition of the Doctoral Advisory Committee after the approval of the proposal, the change must be approved by the Chair of the committee and the Dean of the College.The change must be noted on the "Request for Change in Dissertation Committee" form, found at /grad/forms/, and filed with the Graduate School prior to posting the final dissertation defense.

Final Examination: The dissertation is defended orally.Any discrepancy between the final version of the dissertation and the dissertation proposal should be explained and defended.One copy of the final dissertation should be made available in the office of the Sociology Department at least two weeks before the dissertation defense.

An abstract of the dissertation, not exceeding ten pages, must be given to all faculty members ten days before the defense.The Dissertation Examining Committee is formed to evaluate the quality of the dissertation and conduct the oral defense.The committee includes the Doctoral Advisory Committee and at least one outside examiner.If the outside examiner is not a member of the Temple Graduate Faculty, the Chair of the Doctoral Advisory Committee must request approval by submitting the "Nomination for Service on Doctoral Committee" form, found at/grad/forms/, and the outside examiner’s current curriculum vitae to the Graduate School at least four weeks in advance of the scheduled defense.Approval must be received prior to posting the oral defense.

The Chair of the Dissertation Examining Committee must be a member of the Graduate Faculty, but may not be the Chair of the candidate’s Doctoral Advisory Committee. This person, responsible for coordinating and conducting the defense, must be identified when the defense is posted with the Graduate School on the "Announcement of Dissertation Defense" form, found at/grad/forms/.All dissertation oral defense examinations are publicly announced by the Sociology Department in writing at least ten days in advance of the examination.The written announcement must be sent to all members of the Dissertation Examining Committee, all graduate faculty in the candidate's department, and the Graduate School.All dissertation examinations are open to the entire academic community.Normally, the dissertation defense is held during the regular academic year.A dissertation defense passed after the Graduate School deadline in the Spring does not qualify the student for a May degree.A summer defense may be scheduled only if all members of the committee agree.The entire dissertation committee must attend the defense.

If one or more committee members fail to attend the defense, the Departmental Chair cannot sign the form certifying the defense.All faculty members and students are invited to participate in the dissertation defense.The dissertation committee must vote unanimously that the student has passed the Ph.Each member of the dissertation committee indicates her/his assessment of the examination and signs her/his name to the "Final Examination Report for Doctoral Candidates" form, found at /grad/forms/.If the Chair of the Sociology Department agrees that the dissertation meets departmental standards, s/he signifies her/his approval by signing for the department as well on the "Final Examination Report for Doctoral Candidates" form.The completed form is submitted to the Dean's Office of the College of Liberal Arts.Information regarding the required format of the dissertation is available in the Graduate School's Dissertation and Thesis Handbook, found at /grad/.

A processing fee must be paid to the Temple University Bursar as shown on the "Dissertation/Thesis Processing Fee" form, found at /grad/forms/.

Fees may also be required when filing the dissertation electronically, within 30 days of the dissertation defense, at /cgi-bin/school?siteId=171.The student should heed the instructions found on the "Final Checklist of Dissertation Materials," identified as Appendix M1 in the Graduate School's Dissertation and Thesis Handbook.Note that the signature page bearing original ink signatures constitutes the only item required to be submitted in hard copy to the Graduate School.Students must apply to graduate, through the Sociology Department, by the deadline date announced in the graduate catalog each year.The deadline is usually three or four months before graduation.

Applications may be obtained from the department's Graduate Coordinator or online.Upon completion of the doctoral program, the student is required to submit a bound copy of her/his dissertation to the Sociology Department, as well as a regular hard copy to the Chair of the Dissertation Examining Committee.This course has four objectives, to provide you with understandings of (1) basic methods of descriptive statistics, like means, medians, quartile spreads, standard deviations, and skewness, (2) random variation and how different samples selected from the same population may provide different results, (3) the basic idea of statistical inference, i., how we make judgments about what is the population that provided the sample result that we have observed, and (4) how to evaluate possible associations between two variables.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Socialization is the process by which individuals become members of society.We look at this process as ongoing, starting in infancy and continuing through adulthood.

This implies constant re-socialization and discussion of the ways early childhood learning influences adult lives.This research-intensive course is organized around the important socialization agents of family, friends, school, work, and the differences in socialization and therefore life histories by race, gender, and social class.Students undertake individual research on the socialization of children as they begin grade school.This involves developing a research question, developing questionnaires, interviewing a child and his/her caregivers, and analyzing the findings.The course includes instruction on each phase of the research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course examines the ways men and women develop sexual identities as a result of their membership in society.It looks at how this has changed over the course of Western history and at the differences in sexual identity from culture to culture.We focus on the differences in sexual identities of men and women, and the advantages this brings to men.We also examine the overwhelming heterosexual imperative in our society.Students research these and other topics such as differences in sexual expression by race, and the influence of the media on how we understand the meaning and expression of sex.

The research requirement for the course involves an analysis of sexual scripts, the production and reproduction of these scripts, and the impact of the messages on different types of viewers.Instruction is provided on film analysis.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This class is a survey of aspects of the field of urban sociology.Urban sociology is an enterprise that looks at cities -- the intersection of people and space with political and economic structures superimposed on both.Space has been the primary concept that defines much of urban sociology because of the vital role of space and location in defining urban life and opportunities.

Topics will include suburbanization, downtown development, racial and ethnic segregation, poverty, immigration, gender, globalization, culture and virtual communities.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course analyzes the social basis of political institutions and political action, stressing the importance of both in the life of communities and individuals.Our emphasis is on the influence of social classes, professional and occupational groups, political parties, social movement organizations, and other notable interest groups have on the political system.We discuss the formation and organization of political activity and its varied outcomes.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.To begin, we focus on the interaction among four components: population size, social organization, environmental conditions, and available technology.

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We consider issues such as the relationships among the technology of farming, the volume of agricultural production, and the availability of labor for economic development.We learn about "input-output" models focusing on the intensity of resource use and problems of waste management. We take this basic model and apply it to the problem of climate change or "global warming Best website to buy a coursework sociology 5 days American Senior Business.We take this basic model and apply it to the problem of climate change or "global warming.

"How and why is the climate changing, and what are the social factors that contribute to it? Then, we concentrate on issues of social organization.What kinds of political arrangements do we see for the management of waste?How does the transfer of natural resources from resource-rich but economically underdeveloped countries to the United States and other industrial societies affect the social, economic, and political arrangements of both groups of countries?Finally, we address whether the society can be organized in such a way as to reduce the pressure on the environment and remaining natural resources Home · Graduate · Admissions; Frequently Asked Questions. Menu Submenu for: Graduate. Graduate Home · Program Overview · Admissions · Application Information · Additional Funding Opportunities for Applicants · Frequently Asked Questions · Courses · Financial Information · Graduate Student Resources  .

What kinds of political arrangements do we see for the management of waste?How does the transfer of natural resources from resource-rich but economically underdeveloped countries to the United States and other industrial societies affect the social, economic, and political arrangements of both groups of countries?Finally, we address whether the society can be organized in such a way as to reduce the pressure on the environment and remaining natural resources.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course examines social movements with an emphasis on the Post World War II era, leading up to and including our contemporary "Information Age nbd-dhofar.com/essay/get-an-abortion-essay-a4-british-european-business-writing.This course examines social movements with an emphasis on the Post World War II era, leading up to and including our contemporary "Information Age." It briefly introduces the history of social movements and revolutions and then explores in greater depth how sociologists frame, analyze, study, and explain the emergence, maintenance, outcomes, and social control of social movements.Finally, the course concentrates in the contemporary period and examines how Globalization, mass media, and Information and Communication Technologies (IT) have laid the basis for new forms of connectivity, new kinds of sharing, cooperation, and creative forms of social networking and activism.Will the "placeless" world of cyberspace and new media eliminate or dramatically constrain the possibility of revolution? How will the enhanced proliferation and dissemination of information and means of communication change ways people associate and assemble? Will it diminish mass mobilizations of political power and popular/radical consciousness or will a "network society" enable people to act in ways that collective action was not possible before? Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

The social context of the construction of health and disease in the United States, focusing on reproduction and death, the epidemic of AIDS, and issues emerging from the aging of the American population.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.Social class is a fundamental dimension of inequality in modern society.

This course examines the sources and consequences of social class, with particular focus on the intersection of class with other forms of inequality in the context of the United States.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.The topics will vary and cover areas not covered by the current roster of classes.Please consult with the instructor for details.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

The topics will vary and cover areas not covered by the current roster of classes.

Please consult with the instructor for details.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.The topics will vary and cover areas not covered by the current roster of classes.Please consult with the instructor for details.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.This course is an introduction to the logic and methods of social research.We will examine the issues that arise in doing and evaluating both quantitative and qualitative research by reading the sociological literature.We will spend some time on the simple tools, e.

tables and graphs, needed to summarize research results.However the focus will be on larger issues, namely, how researchers draw conclusions from empirical data, and how we can assess the validity of the conclusions they reach.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This course reviews the main lines of sociological and other "social" thought of the modern times (roughly from the 1660s to our time), paying attention to four basic directions in theorizing: (1) The liberal and "classical economic" theories of John Locke and Adam Smith and the rise of neo-classical (neo-liberal) thinking rational choice theory and its variations .(2) The liberal-idealist theory of German philosophy (since Kant) and the "interpretative" and "subjectivist" paradigm of Wax Weber and various neo- and nearly-Weberians.

(3) The "social-structural" ("dialectical" in the old language) theory of Karl Marx and its many offshoots neo-Marxisms, half-Marxisms (such as "Critical Theory," etc.(4) The "collectivist" (sociologistic) theory of Emile Durkheim and its contemporary versions "structuralist" (Blau), "culturalist" and "functionalist" (Parsons), "systems" (Luhmann), or "neo-functionalist" (Faia, Alexander) .Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Inferential and Multivariate Statistics.This course starts with a review of bivariate statistics and moves quickly into multivariate statistics focusing on multiple regression.The emphasis of this course is on conceptual understanding, interpretation, and application.

 All major computations are performed using the SPSS computing program.Students are also expected to learn the basic skills for working with large social science data sets, such as the GSS.This course serves as a prerequisite for SOC 9211, which involves the application of the statistical procedures taught in this class to the study of real social issues through secondary data analysis.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This course introduces the assumptions, theories and practices of qualitative research methods.The course is designed to provide opportunities for developing specific qualitative research skills while gaining familiarity with theories, issues, and problems in qualitative research.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course surveys the social demographic research on immigration, broadly conceived, and the numerous social, economic, and political processes with which it intersects.The course has two main goals: (1) to introduce students to the sources of data most commonly used by social demographers to study immigration and to social demographic methods; and (2) to critically review the leading social demographic research literature on the dynamics of immigration and social change.The data and research covered during the semester will focus primarily on the United States, but a non-negligible share of the course will be devoted to cross-national comparisons, the global migration system, and transnationalism and development.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This course examines many of the ethical dimensions of conducting social research.Social researchers are accountable to: a) their own consciences and their own ethics, b) the actual people they are studying, c) international and federal laws, d) institutional policies and practices, e) their disciplines and sub-fields, f) their peers and colleagues, and g) any other communities to which they belong or in which they participate.

This course examines a series of readings organized around key themes in research ethics.In addition, students are asked to investigate particular cases of alleged research misconduct and to take a position on the controversy.By the end of this class, students should: 1) Know the key laws and statues governing social research; 2) Be familiar with the ethical resources available to social researchers; 3) Be able to evaluate the ethics of particular research cases; and 4) Be able to weigh ethical dilemmas in their own research practice and make responsible decisions about those dilemmas.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

The main focus is on the ways educational systems both maintain and challenge social inequality.Students discuss the ways education differentially allocates resources based on race, class, and gender.

The class explores this issue in both "classical readings" in the Sociology of Education, and also in recent books by those working in the field. Books chosen for the course are intended to begin discussion on contemporary debates.The class pays special attention to whether the policies discussed by them ameliorate or exacerbate existing inequalities by race, class, and/or gender. This course has three main objectives: (1) prepare students for the preliminary examination in the Sociology of Education through discussions of main theories, ideas, and classical works in the field; (2) promote critical debate about contemporary issues in education by reading and discussing "hot topics" in education like debates over curricula, "marketing" universities, racial inequality in school achievement, and school choice; and (3) advance students' own research projects through frequent discussions and evaluations of students' work by the instructor and their peers.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

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Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This is a graduate seminar designed to examine the social conditions of politics and the relationship between state and society.

Issues of concern include theories of power and political regimes, historical and comparative political studies, the development and role of the modern state, forms of political organization and participation, democracy, the welfare state and the politics of globalization Course work requirements for a Ph.D. in Rural Sociology.   R SOC 508 Sociology of Agriculture; R SOC 525 Population and Development; R SOC 530 Demography & Sociology of Poverty in the United States; R SOC 552 Rural Community Theory; R SOC 555 Human Dimensions of Natural Resources; R SOC 597 [Special  .Issues of concern include theories of power and political regimes, historical and comparative political studies, the development and role of the modern state, forms of political organization and participation, democracy, the welfare state and the politics of globalization.

A main objective of this course is to develop an understanding of how social actors shape the political system and how political systems, in turn, shape social structures.In addition, the course has a research component designed to provide students with the opportunity to examine in depth a topic their choice with an empirical outlook COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS   The program's main areas of graduate teaching and research are Gender and Sexuality, Immigration and Globalization, Medical Sociology, Race and Ethnicity, and Urban   A limit of 9 credits of graduate coursework taken prior to admission will be accepted toward a Sociology degree..In addition, the course has a research component designed to provide students with the opportunity to examine in depth a topic their choice with an empirical outlook.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS   The program's main areas of graduate teaching and research are Gender and Sexuality, Immigration and Globalization, Medical Sociology, Race and Ethnicity, and Urban   A limit of 9 credits of graduate coursework taken prior to admission will be accepted toward a Sociology degree..Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This course focuses on the nature of racism, discrimination, prejudice, racial conflict, and racial oppression in American society nbd-dhofar.com/homework/where-to-find-a-college-writing-help-economics-homework-business-chicago-turabian-143-pages-39325-words.This course focuses on the nature of racism, discrimination, prejudice, racial conflict, and racial oppression in American society.Special emphasis will be given to the relationship between race, gender, nationality, immigration status and social class.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course will survey a range of topics from the field of sociology of kinship: historical changes in kinship as well as global changes in the family over the twentieth century; inequalities in families related to social class, social capital and family life;inequalities related to race and ethnicity; comparative adolescence and transitions to adulthood; sexuality and love in transnational contexts; perspectives on psychic and intimate relations in families; gender and power relations within the family; the state, public policy and the politics of kinship relations and more.We will also examine how the family came to be a centrally contested sphere in contemporary American political debates.Finally, you will have hands-on experience formulating a research proposal that investigates a research question related to this literature as well as assessing and responding to the proposals of your classmates.The purpose of the seminar is to review some of the major debates in this rapidly evolving field and to gain experience in formulating viable research questions about contemporary kinship issues.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This seminar reviews the development of organizational theory, with a special emphasis on recent work in economic sociology and the sociology of corporations.

Specific topics include the role of markets and networks, the control and consent of the workforce, business structure, inter-organizational analysis and organizational culture.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course is about the space and urban sociology.The goal of this course is twofold:1) to review, assess and analyze important theoretical perspectives on space in urban sociology, and 2) to determine the utility of applying these perspectives to contemporary urban issues.Urban problems will be examined largely from the perspective of how space and location are linked to these problems and they will not be investigated in their own right.The underlying theme of this course relates to theoretical propositions around space.

This course will also focus on research from the vantage point of how theory can and should be used as a foundation for conceptualizing research problems.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.The goal of this class is to survey the breadth of work that has been conducted under the sociology of culture, to identify the many ways that culture has been shown to be powerful, to examine competing theories about how culture works, to identify the types of research methods that can be used in cultural analysis, and to pinpoint the ways that each of us can embrace a cultural perspective in our own research.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course reviews theories and research regarding the dimensions of inequality and the processes which create, increase, and decrease inequality.It also examines the issues of the relationships between the dimensions of inequality and the processes of cumulative advantage and disadvantage.Individuals, groups, areas, and other social contexts are typically organized hierarchically, and the course explores the ways in which these different social levels shape and are shaped by social inequality over the life course.

Examples of these processes include social multiplier effects, "winner take all" theories, the "Matthew Effect" in science, and the "Peter Principle." Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course examines the historical changes in the ideas of health and disease and in society's response to illness.An important component of the course will be to examine the influences of social/political environment on morbidity and mortality in the United States and how population sub-groups experience illness in the medical system.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This is a research intensive course in which we will examine the historical and sociological structures underlying relationships of sexuality and gender.The perspective of the course is that sexuality is a social creation with meaning to be found in culture.

Sexuality is learned through socialization and resocialization.This learning takes place within a gendered social system and so sexuality itself is gendered in our culture.We will examine a number of theoretical perspectives and read the major sociological work in the field.The course will be divided into a reading seminar during the first half of each class and research presentations by students in the second half.

During the course of the semester each student will each work on a topic of her choosing and will present her progress to class periodically.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.Globally, the majority of humans now live in cities.Yet questions about what makes for healthy cities—and how we can measure and assess the complex relationship between health and place—continue to pose theoretical and methodological challenges for planners, social scientists, and biomedical researchers.Recent scholarship in the sociology of health and illness has focused on how the social determinants of health—sometimes called the non-medical determinants of health—powerfully shape health and mortality outcomes.Poverty, social isolation, political ideologies and economic policies, neighborhood contexts and effects of social networks have all been shown to be influential in determining the health and well-being both of entire groups and the individuals in them, acting as a serious constraint on (or enabler of) basic life chances.This course focuses on the empirical evidence for these health disparities and the theories about how and why they manifest as they do in urban settings.

This seminar is designed to appeal to students interested in urban health, population health, the sociology of health and illness, and place and health.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This graduate course is designed to critically examine the competing perspectives, historical processes, and key issues and debates in the study of globalization and development.Our emphasis is on the relationships between local and global social, economic, political, and cultural processes.In particular, we will focus on the late 20th century and early 21st century "globalization," known as the "neo-liberal globalization," and how the forces of globalization interact with the development trajectories of nation-states, societies, and communities.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.The topics will vary and cover areas not covered by the current roster of classes.

Please consult with the instructor for details.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.The topics will vary and cover areas not covered by the current roster of classes.Please consult with the instructor for details.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

This course introduces sociology graduate students to departmental faculty and their work.Faculty members describe their research, theory development, and/or policy work.

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This course is required of all entering graduate students.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits Best website to purchase college sociology coursework American 35 pages / 9625 words 20 days University.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This course introduces sociology graduate students to departmental faculty and their work.Faculty members describe their research, theory development, and/or policy work.This course is required of all entering graduate students Sample Cover Letter for a Social Science Faculty Position. Office of PopulationResearch   I am writing regarding the tenure-trackposition of Assistant Professor of Sociology. I learned about this position   when I was one of nine graduate student instructors in the College of Arts and Sciences to receive the Dean's Award  .This course is required of all entering graduate students.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.The processes and problems related to classroom teaching at the undergraduate level.

This course is required of all new teaching assistants.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.The processes and problems related to classroom teaching at the undergraduate level.This is a practicum workshop required of all students teaching their first course as a teaching assistant.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course introduces students to micro-computer word processing, data base, spreadsheet, and graphing programs.

Accessing and using a mainframe computer to generate descriptive statistics.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course surveys a broad range of theoretical perspectives from the 20th and 21st centuries. The course compares these theories in terms of how they contribute to on-going sociological research around a number of social problems.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This is an advanced course that examines the current status of social theory, familiarizes students with the parameters and process of sociological theorizing, and appraises critically the most significant recent theoretical exemplars and proposals.Knowledge of the classics and a review of contemporary social theories are required for this course; students are expected to do an intensive review of the classical and modern writings before entering the more demanding topics and materials.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.A seminar that offers the students the opportunity for specialized study of one of the most debated issues in sociology nowadays: social and cultural identities.The course will deal with the last developments in identity theory, emphasizing the work of Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Ernesto Laclau, Chantal Mouffe, Slavoj Zizek, Stuart Hall, Craig Calhoun, R.Perinbanayagam, James Holstein, Jaber Gubrium, Judith Butler, Lawrence Grossberg, Charles Taylor and Paul Ricouer, among others.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This course provides a broad introduction to the major theories, approaches, issues and debates in the studies of globalization.

Globalization has redefined not only the way we understand society at the very basic level but also our own sense of place and identity in a world where we are connected to and influenced by events and people in far off places.Substantively, this course will focus on the relationships between local and global social, economic, political, and cultural processes across time and space.Our scope will be global and historical-comparative, and our approach will be sociological and interdisciplinary.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

In this course, you will do original sociological research using secondary data analysis.In this course, in addition to looking for meaningful relationships between variables in the data, we apply quantitative research methods to examine explanations for why relationships between variables may exist.

To do this, we explore whether and how a relationship between two variables changes when we add a third (or fourth or fifth…) variable.The research process consists of several steps: (1) construct a research question, (2) formulate one or more theories related to your research question based on a literature review, (3) turn those theories into testable hypotheses, and (4) test those hypotheses using secondary data.Your research will be presented in a final paper organized according to the standards of the discipline and then summarized in an oral presentation.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Theory and Practice of Statistical Sampling.This course presents the basic ideas for commonly used statistical sampling strategies.We discuss methods of sampling when the assumptions for simple random sampling are not met.

We cover methods of stratification, selecting with probabilities proportional to size, clustering and weighting.In each case we study how to calculate statistical estimates with variances and confidence intervals.The course also focuses on issue of statistical design, and how to create a design which will have the best chance of providing answers relevant to the important research questions of the study.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

The objective is to instill an understanding of the survey process.To do this, students must learn to write questions and appreciate the ways that different question-writing strategies affect the types of answers respondents give.

 We engage in three activities: (1) the actual writing of questions, (2) the discussion of the effects of different question-writing strategies, and (3) the discussion of methods of evaluating errors on surveys. There are two basic "theorems" of survey research. The first is that playing the "respondent's" role creates a burden for the people we interview, and that if we overtax the respondent, the weight of this burden causes the quality of their answers to deteriorate.The second is that respondents and interviewers create relationships, and neither typically wants to spoil the relationship. If the interviewer continues to ask questions, the respondent usually continues to answer the questions, even though these answers have little or no meaning.

The good survey researcher develops strategies to detect when this occurs and to adjust her analyses accordingly.One of the major goals of this course is to help in the development of these strategies.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.The central goal of this course is to have students complete a qualitative research project.It focuses on how to collect data, how to organize data for analysis, and how to use the data to answer a research question and/or develop concepts that might inform future research.

Toward this end, the course begins with readings about the qualitative research process.

The readings detail the agenda(s), logic, and epistemological foundation of qualitative research.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.Departmental Seminar in Research Methods.

The topics in research methods will vary and cover areas not covered by the current roster of classes.Please consult with the instructor for details.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

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Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

The causes, consequences, and repercussions of immigration constitute one of the most important topics of the 21st century.This course surveys key current theoretical debates in the study of international migration with an emphasis on related literature dealing with gender, kinship, and ethnicity Per the departmental guidelines for formal admission to the doctoral program, 18 points of courses taken for a letter grade (or pass/fail) are to be completed in the first   To earn the M.Phil. degree, students must complete all requirements for the M.A. degree, six Residence Units, required coursework, and four essential tasks  .

This course surveys key current theoretical debates in the study of international migration with an emphasis on related literature dealing with gender, kinship, and ethnicity.

Considered are theoretical approaches to international migration; controversies regarding assimilation; the framing of migration throughgender and kinship relations, social networks, and social capital; family ideologies and achievement; and the social context of immigration, ethnic niches and enclaves, transnationalism, empirical trends in post-WWII United States immigration and settlement, second-generation immigrant patterns, and immigration policies and politics.The long-term goal is to encourage students to undertake research in the field of migration research.This field is unique in its interdisciplinary and methodologically pluralist nature: stretching from the demography and economics of migration, through political science, sociological and geographical approaches, to the ethnography and oral history of migrants Our graduate student community is small, enabling students to have fulfilling mentoring relationships with faculty and to collaborate meaningfully on research and   Our program has a near-perfect placement rate: most of our graduates who pursue academic placements in the U.S. meet their professional goals, and many  .This field is unique in its interdisciplinary and methodologically pluralist nature: stretching from the demography and economics of migration, through political science, sociological and geographical approaches, to the ethnography and oral history of migrants.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits nbd-dhofar.com/dissertation/where-to-order-a-geography-dissertation-undergraduate-british-14-days.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

This course focuses on theories and analyses that seek to explain the social salience of race.The selected readings explore various concepts that surround the study of race, such as racism, white supremacy, oppression and subordination, nationalism, sexism and inequality.

Many scholars believe that modernity, capitalism, and race are coterminous.We will explore in this seminar those connections.Some of the questions that we will explore are: How did the racial dimension of world society come to be, and how did it gain such weight in the organization of social/economic/political processes? How are the racial dimensions of society constituted and changed? How are they related to other central aspects of society, such as class, gender, ethnicity, age, nationality, citizenship, etc.? What is the relation between race, racism and whiteness? Is it a colorblind society possible? What is a "race narrative" and how it affects people's identities and social structures? Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

With the consent of the graduate chairperson and the instructor concerned, students may select an intensive program of study and/or research within a specific area of sociology.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.The internship in social research provides a learning experience that unites the core concepts of sociology with professional organizational settings and the community as a whole, while also guiding students as they transition into their own professional lives.

Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.Internship in Social Research - Part II.The internship in social research provides a learning experience that unites the core concepts of sociology with professional organizational settings and the community as a whole, while also guiding students as they transition into their own professional lives.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.This is an advanced reading course for students preparing for the preliminary examination.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.This course is for advanced graduate students who are developing a dissertation.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

This course is for advanced graduate students, post-candidacy, working on their dissertations.Level Registration Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels: Graduate.

Student Attribute Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Student Attributes: Dissertation Writing Student.Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.Contacts Contents There is no specific number of course credits of instruction and research beyond the master's level required for the Ph.Rather, award of the degree is made at such time as minimal course requirements are met and the student demonstrates to his or her committee and to the Department that he or she is a well-trained, competent, and professional sociologist.

Thus, it is impossible to specify that exact amount of time necessary to complete the degree.However, it is expected that a student on a half-time assistantship will finish the doctoral program in 10 semesters (3 1/4 years) beyond a master's degree.students are expected to be prepared in four areas: Rural Sociology two areas of concentration of their choice.Our four main areas include: sociology of food and agriculture; natural resources / environmental sociology; community and international development; and rural social demography.A student may also design his/her own concentration, in consultation with the adviser.If a student is pursuing a dual-title program, one of the areas of concentration should correspond with the dual-title program of choice (e., Demography; Human Dimensions of Natural Resources and the Environment (HDNRE); International Agriculture and Development (INTAD); Women’s Studies).Core Course Requirements Core courses provide a broad overview of rural sociology, rural sociological theory, and the issues facing rural people both domestically and internationally.Four courses are needed to meet the core course requirement.Take the following course or an equivalent theory course: R SOC 502 Use of Theory in Rural Sociology Take one of the following two courses: R SOC 516 Change in Rural Society R SOC 517 International Rural Social Change Take any two of the following courses (the list includes R SOC 516 and 517 if not taken above): R SOC 508 Sociology of Agriculture R SOC 525 Population and Development R SOC 530 Demography & Sociology of Poverty in the United States R SOC 552 Rural Community Theory R SOC 555 Human Dimensions of Natural Resources R SOC 597 Special topics courses Methods and Statistics Course Requirements Ph.students in Rural Sociology need to become equipped with a minimum level of research skills within the first year of training.The Methods and Statistics area requirements are designed to provide a basic understanding of social research methods and statistics.students must meet the following four-course minimum requirements, recognizing that thorough competency often requires additional coursework: R SOC 513 “Research Methods in the Rural Social Sciences” R SOC 514 “Qualitative Methods” Two graduate-level (500 and above) statistics coursesLanguage Requirement There is no language or communications requirement for the Ph.

in Rural Sociology beyond the Graduate School's requirement of competency in English.English Language Competency The ability to effectively and competently read, write, and speak the English language is critical for success in Rural Sociology at The Pennsylvania State University.Course work in our program involves extensive reading on topics that span the range from the philosophic to the technical, and the ever present need to use English to express information and ideas in both verbal discussions and written assignments.candidates attain a high level of English ability, the following strategy for the assessment and remediation of English deficiencies is followed.Reading Writing On their own, students must be able to compose clear and understandable English, with a minimum of blatant grammatical, spelling and punctuation errors.Speaking Written and Oral Evaluation Beginning in the Fall 1992 semester, the Graduate Program Committee in Rural Sociology will be responsible for assessing the English ability of all entering Ph.

students during the first month of their enrollment.This preliminary assessment will consist primarily of a one-day examination that will have three phases.First, students will be given an hour to read a sociological research article.The article will be chosen by the Graduate Program Committee and will: Be easily readable in an hour Be written at about the advanced undergraduate level Have a mixture of theoretical discussion and empirical analysis Focus on a topic of general appeal Second, students will be given four hours to write an essay about the article, guided by questions suggested by the Graduate Program Committee.This essay will be limited to four pages in length.

Third, after reading these essays the Committee will meet with each student to appraise their verbal abilities in English.The student will be asked to present a brief synopsis of their essay and be expected to answer questions about it.We stress that the intent is not to evaluate the student's command of Rural Sociology, but merely to assess their ability to read, write and speak English.This evaluation will be complemented by other evidence of English ability.The latter might include TOEFL scores, assessments by recommendation letter writers and other outside sources, or by examples of written work by the student.

Together, this information will be reviewed by the Graduate Program Committee who will then decide whether remediation is warranted, and if so, suggest an appropriate course of action.Waiver of Written and Oral Evaluation If there is compelling evidence that matriculants already meet or exceed acceptable standards of English ability, the Graduate Program Committee will have the option of waiving the written and oral evaluation.Candidacy Examination A candidacy examination must be taken by all students intending to earn the Ph.The examination is administered by the candidate's doctoral committee within three semesters of entry into the doctoral program (summer sessions do not count) but not before the students has completed 18 credits of graduate courses beyond the baccalaureate.

A plan of study is developed by the student with the help of his/her committee in advance of the candidacy meeting, and is generally approved, perhaps with revision, during the meeting.Students whose native language is not English must also meet the TOEFL and English language competency requirements to be admitted.candidate must pass a comprehensive (combined written and oral) examination in rural sociology, research methods and statistics, and two chosen areas of specialization.

The comprehensive exam is normally taken after the candidate's course work has been substantially completed and is administered in response to the student's petition.Final Oral Examination Upon completion of the student’s doctoral thesis, a final oral examination is scheduled.

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The exam is administered by the student’s doctoral committee and focuses on the student’s dissertation research.