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Architecture degrees top universities

So then,what is architecture? Architecture is the art and science of designing and engineering large structures and buildings.Those who choose to study architecture will have enthusiasm for both the sciences and the arts, and architecture admissions requirements typically consider both artistic ability and mathematical proficiency.

Architects design structures fit for human use and therefore are largely responsible for the safety and reliability of these structures, so students must be prepared to study for a relatively long period before becoming a fully fledged, licensed architect   the Charities Act 2006. Accessibility | Disclaimer | FOI | Data Protection | Privacy and Cookies | Charitable Status | Modern Slavery. University of Bolton, Deane Road, Bolton, BL3 5AB Tel: +44 (0)1204 900600 Email: [email protected] To make a Freedom of Information Request please email us at [email protected]  .Architects design structures fit for human use and therefore are largely responsible for the safety and reliability of these structures, so students must be prepared to study for a relatively long period before becoming a fully fledged, licensed architect.

Although regulations of architecture licensing vary from region to region, often you will have to commit to at least five years of study (bachelor’s and master’s degree levels) and two years of practical work experience.If asked to answer the question “what is architecture?” many people might simply say that architects design buildings Mary C Brock University.If asked to answer the question “what is architecture?” many people might simply say that architects design buildings.However,architecture careers often involve a much more varied workload.Much of the time, a practicing architect at a small- to medium-sized firm will also be involved in planning, budgeting, handling financial accounts, negotiating with contractors, ensuring compliance with health and safety regulations on site, and preparing specifications for materials and workmanship.

What to expect from architecture degrees Undergraduate architecture degrees will teach students everything from how a beam works to how to accurately draw 3D designs, both by hand and using computer programs.The bulk of your studies are likely to be based in a studio for design work, combined with tutorials and critique lessons.The critique sessions, otherwise known as ‘crits’, are sessions in art and design education where a student presents work to tutors and fellow students, and then receives feedback on that work.Students of architecture courses will also attend lectures on history, theory and technology as well as computer-aided design tutorials, which aim to provide students with proficiency in various design programs to help them complete individual projects.

Essays are also a staple of architecture degrees, as are frequent site visits to important buildings and places of architectural interest.

Those who study architecture at undergraduate level will graduate in three to four years with a BA or BSc depending on the program.In the UK this bachelor’s qualification will usually include the ARB/RIBA (Architects Registration Board/Royal Institute of British Architects) Part 1 examinations, which you need before taking the Part 2 examinations (often included within a Masters in Architecture) and Part 3 examinations (a further postgraduate degree or relevant experience).These ‘parts’ are the official ARB/RIBA requirements which all training architects are required to gain in addition to practical experience.After completing all the necessary stages in your country, you’ll be a licensed architect with a BArch or DipArch qualification depending on the course.Architecture topics A typical architecture degree will start with core architecture courses designed to give you essential grounding in the history of architecture and current trends, as well as introducing you to key research methods, laws and regulations, conservation and sustainability issues, and modules to hone your analytical and numerical skills.

From the second year onwards, you will be given more opportunities to focus on your specialized interests, choosing one or more architecture topics on which to focus.The possible specializations will vary depending on your institution, but some common options include: Architectural technology The specialization of architectural technology combines the creative art of architecture with the technological aspects needed to bring designs to life.Specialists in architectural technology will be highly IT literate and will work with a range of computer software every day including 3D design programs.Students specializing in this field will learn to apply scientific principles and practical knowledge in order to analyze the requirements and challenges of construction projects and apply suitable technology, materials and processes to bring a design to fruition.Architectural technology specialists will also need strong drawing skills, problem-solving abilities and attention to detail.

Architectural engineering Architectural engineering is a highly technical specialization which focuses less on design and art and more on the mathematics and physics of creating a structure.Students of architectural engineering will look at functional design systems for structures such as lighting, ventilation, heating and cooling.Close to the subject of civil engineering, specialists in architectural engineering often go on to work with public structures with an emphasis on functionality (rather than aesthetic appeal), for instance in the building of structures such as dams, canals and roadways.Architectural design An architectural design specialization has a stronger focus on the creative side of architecture, requiring students to have strong drawing and design skills.Students will also develop technical skills in their studies, with an emphasis on designing and creating buildings and spaces connected to human living and working environments.

Study of architectural design is often mainly studio-based and students will be given the chance to research and explore their potential as creative designers in individual architectural design projects.Architectural history The study of architectural history means exploring the cultural and historical context of architecture and the built environment around the globe.The focus will be on the historical, social, political and critical contexts of how and why we design buildings and spaces.Unlike most architecture topics, architectural history is taught largely through a theoretical approach.Interior architecture Students of interior architecture will focus on understanding and developing interior spaces using a variety of design approaches.

Specialists in this field learn how to create visually pleasing and functional spaces through studying aspects of color, material, lighting, media, shape and form.Architectural principles are applied to the design of interior space in different settings such as private residences, the hospitality industry and commercial builds as well as public and institutional spaces.Graduates specializing in interior architecture will gain the skills needed to develop careers in exhibition design, installation work, furniture design, or as a professional interior architecture designer.Landscape architecture Those specializing in landscape architecture will have an interest in the environment and the design of the land and outdoor spaces humans inhabit in various ways.There is a strong focus on sustainability and conservation within this specialization, as well as the chance to study the development of urban landscapes.

Landscape architecture students will learn about the social, ecological and geological processes that form and contribute to existing landscapes, as well as studying the materials, technologies and management of landscape design.The interaction of urban environments with natural ones is also often a key focus, especially for landscape architecture courses taught at urban institutions.Specialists in landscape architecture may go into professions such as urban design or planning, site planning, environmental restoration, parks and recreation planning, and landscape design and planning.Urban planning Students who study architecture with a specialization in urban planning will focus on the design of the built environment, ranging from scaled detailing on street signs all the way to bird’s eye views of the metropolitan structure as a whole.An urban planning specialization bridges the gap between architecture and planning by studying each discipline as a critical inquiry into the other.

Urban planning courses often offer community-based learning as well as studio and seminar work and provide case studies in urban design and sustainable design, as well as physical and spatial planning.Architecture careers Architecture careers are much more diverse than they might initially appear.Many practicing architects choose to work for themselves on a self-employed basis, or within a partnership (similar a law firm), although some do work for larger companies on fixed salaries.

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Depending on you’re the architecture topics you chose to specialize in, architecture careers can provide a highly varied workload.You may choose to focus on residential builds or specialize in commercial designs, be involved in the design of large public projects or work for several different smaller clients at a time.

The variety of projects you take on means that every day of working life will be a little bit different and your time will often be split between your studio or office and visits to construction sites and working environments Undergraduate Courses Department of History UC Berkeley.The variety of projects you take on means that every day of working life will be a little bit different and your time will often be split between your studio or office and visits to construction sites and working environments.

In a smaller firm, architects will often provide a range of services, beyond just design.These services may include handling your client’s finances, hiring and negotiating with contractors, planning, budgeting and generally ensuring the smooth running of the entire project.Some architects will choose to focus on just specific aspects however, and architecture careers within larger companies provide opportunities for more specialized focus Champion Gouvernail, North American Association for Environmental Education Voyageur. Canoe Race (25   Association for Experiential Education Experiential Teacher of the Year Award 2008. Nomination for   Assistant Professor, Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Brock University, July 2006. - June 2010..Some architects will choose to focus on just specific aspects however, and architecture careers within larger companies provide opportunities for more specialized focus.Landscape architecture careers Landscape architecture careers can include many different skills and services, with a focus on the planning, designing and management of outdoor space nbd-dhofar.com/thesis-proposal/help-me-write-a-business-communication-thesis-proposal-college-senior-editing-premium.

Landscape architecture careers Landscape architecture careers can include many different skills and services, with a focus on the planning, designing and management of outdoor space.

Landscape architects can be involved in anything from the establishment of a wind farm to the creation of a car park.Those interested in landscape architecture careers will often have a love of the outdoors and a specialized degree in landscape architecture.Architectural planning careers As an architectural planner you may work in town or national planning, planning policy, environmental planning and transport planning, to name just a few options.Your employer may be the central government, a local authority or even any private development and regeneration company.Your career may see you addressing issues linked to climate change, helping to protect areas of countryside, waterways and shorelines, or promoting energy efficiency within your town or country.

This career path often involves a close emphasis on engaging with communities, as well as a focus on the future of spaces and places.Other careers with an architecture degree Although most graduates of architecture will go on to become licensed architects and practice professionally in the field, there are many other alternative career paths to consider – particularly roles which require creative and visual skills, technical ability and knowledge of buildings.These career options include roles in spatial design, graphic design, set design for stage and film, building surveying, housing policy and planning, construction, and conservation and environmental work.Management-level careers within these fields are also often within grasp for those who have undertaken postgraduate study and/or gained professional experience.

Journalism is another route which might appeal; specialist journals and publications relating to architecture or the construction industry will often seek out architecture graduates.

Frequently asked questions on PhD applications Last updated October 2017.I’m going to give some advice and demystify the process of US admissions a bit.I also address the question “Would you be my advisor if I apply?” Since I can’t respond in detail to most emails, I hope this post answers your questions.I won’t demystify entirely, because uniform applications are unhelpful to us reviewers.

But I do want to make the application process easier to understand, both to make it easier for people like me to decipher your application, and also to level the playing field.Undergraduates at the top research institutions have the advantage of advisors who already give them this advice.My experience comes solely from my current role in Chicago Harris PhD admissions, two years on the admissions committee in Yale political science, two in Columbia political science, and one in Columbia sustainable development (which is essentially an applied economics PhD in science, environment and health topics).You would be wise to get second opinions.

You’ll see why we think it is one of the best places to study political economy of development.Other specialities include applied microeconomics, formal political theory, and energy.It’s also one of the only places to get rigorous retraining in both political science and economics.And remember that most (though not all) public policy PhD programs are like applied economics programs.

You will need many of the same requirements for admission.If you are applying to economics or public policy, you absolutely must heed the following: Nearly all of Athey and Mankiw’s advice applies equally well to aspiring political scientists who want to do political economy or development work, and indeed almost any of the applied empirical fields in politics.For advice on political science PhD applications, also see Dan Drezner and Dan Nexon, who focus a little on international relations scholars.My thoughts are are on economics and political science together, with the most relevance for those doing applied empirical work and my fields: development, comparative politics, political economy, and labor.Please point everyone to other sources of PhD advice in the comments.

Should you do a PhD? A first important, simple point: If your goal is to be a professional researcher and instructor, then a PhD makes sense.In particular, if your goal is to be influential in policy and practice, then an MA or MPA or MIA from a US or UK/European institution probably makes far more sense for you (e.Harris, Tufts, SIPA, Princeton, SAIS, HKS, etc).

Or consider the MACRM program here at UChicago’s Harris Public Policy if you want intense and applied research training and the option of a PhD at the end.A PhD is five to seven years, and a Master’s is two.A PhD means you are sacrificing several years of valuable work experience and as much as several hundred thousand dollars in income.I talk about choosing among Masters-level programs here.

One thing to keep in mind: a PhD program, like most organizations, don’t just teach you, they socialize you.They gradually change what you think is interesting and important, the peer group you compare yourself to, the value you place on leisure and family over career, and the kind of life you will value when you emerge.This is good for science, maybe or maybe not so good for you.Where should I go? If you are set on a PhD, then you’ll want to attend an institution with full funding (which often comes in exchange for a reasonable research and teaching load).

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If a PhD is going to land you with tens of thousands in debt, it’s a highly questionable decision.Your first objective is to get the best quality general research training you can.So apply to as many of the top schools as possible and then, once admitted, start to narrow down your choices based on fit and overall quality Best websites to order research proposal recreation and leisure studies double spaced British 128 pages / 35200 words Business.So apply to as many of the top schools as possible and then, once admitted, start to narrow down your choices based on fit and overall quality.

Visit everywhere you are admitted, to be confident it’s the right place for you.The other reason to apply to many places is that the admissions process is not only ridiculously competitive but also somewhat random 1. Recreation and Leisure Studies. Ithaca College. Self-Study Report. Prepared for the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation,. Tourism and Related   Grant Proposals. And Awards. 11. $15,400. 5. $6,150. 10. $14,362. 4. $4,000. Leadership positions in. Professional. Organizations. 4. 6. 7. 5. Editor or Referee. 6. 3..The other reason to apply to many places is that the admissions process is not only ridiculously competitive but also somewhat random.Getting from the 100 attractive candidates down to the 30 to 50 you admit is very idiosyncratic 1. Recreation and Leisure Studies. Ithaca College. Self-Study Report. Prepared for the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation,. Tourism and Related   Grant Proposals. And Awards. 11. $15,400. 5. $6,150. 10. $14,362. 4. $4,000. Leadership positions in. Professional. Organizations. 4. 6. 7. 5. Editor or Referee. 6. 3..Getting from the 100 attractive candidates down to the 30 to 50 you admit is very idiosyncratic.So even strong candidates with a good fit might not get in.That said, schools are much more likely to admit you if you demonstrate a good fit with their faculty–something you need to help them see by researching the faculty and reading their work, and describing how you would fit in.Then explain in the letter the people you see as the best fit (see below).

This is more important in politics than in economics.In my experience, in politics programs they tend to take your cover letter very seriously. Applying to more programs might not change your expected probability of admission very much, but it will reduce the variance.

Ideally, however, you will want entry into the top ten schools in your field because it keeps the most doors open, especially if you want an academic job.It’s not necessarily fair, but it seems to be the way the market works.Especially in economics, which seems to me to be the most hierarchical field in social science.As far as I can tell, PhDs outside the top 30 schools are unlikely to lead to careers in research universities.This varies by discipline, but in the US the top 10 to 20 schools tend to staff the top 100 to 200 US universities.

For those who graduate from lower-ranked programs, many opportunities remain open at teaching universities, think tanks, international institutions, government and the like.There are a lot of fulfilling research careers, and I am willing to bet that rates of job satisfaction are pretty high.I would love to see (and will post) numbers on this if anyone has it for political science or economics.Should you do a PhD in economics, political science, or public policy? As a MPA student, Dani Rodrik advised me: “Look at the people you admire and want to be like, and do what they did.” This is good advice, though it biases you to the areas you know not the areas you don’t.

Most of the political economy scholars I admired at the time trained as economists, so I took the economics route.But I didn’t know the most interesting political science work because I had been trained in economics.So at least be aware of this circular trap.Noah Smith recommends an economics PhD if you’re not sure what PhD you should do.He’s even a little more emphatic than that: “Economics is the best PhD you can possibly get.

” This is a little suspicious coming from an economist.It helps to remember that most people like to make their students in their own image (I am no exception).I think Noah’s advice makes sense if you like economics a lot, if you want to do highly mathematical research, and if you want to be assured of a job.But if you are motivated by other questions, prefer other methods, or if your strengths are somewhere other than math, I don’t see how your path to fulfillment lies through economics.

If for example you are deeply motivated by questions about politics, you will generally learn a lot more about politics in a political science department.Economics is almost unmatched at a very narrow slice of political economy.That’s what you’d expect as a result of specialization.But you will get fairly narrow political training.It worked for me, but you have to decide based on what and who interests you.

If your interests are political economy (like a great many readers of this blog) you will be well served by both economics and political science, with these caveats: Economics, like any PhD, will socialize you to like what the profession likes.If you don’t like what the profession likes, you can either be successful in convincing them it is interesting, or struggle to be considered relevant.As I have written elsewhere, it is extremely difficult to get jobs in other fields like political science, and people like me get them largely by chance.What about policy school PhDs, such as Harris? These are a great fit for people interested in very applied work.

To be honest, it will add a slight hurdle to the already hurdle-strewn process of getting a job in a conventional department such as economics or political science.Successful Harris graduates sometimes receive assistant professorships in economics and political science departments, but more often than not their career paths lie in professional schools of policy, health, education and the like.Finally, there is the Sustainable Development PhD at Columbia, where I used to teach.This is basically an economics PhD where people study applied sciences, health, environment, etc.The biggest mistake I see applicants make is mistaking this for a non-quantitative program.

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This is a hard-headed ultra-quantitative program for people who want to be on the frontier of both economics and science at the same time, and requires all the math requirements of economics to be considered (see below).Okay, so what does it take to get into a top school? For entry into the top 10 or 15 schools, it is exceptionally competitive. In short, focus on getting good recommendations, experience, grades and GRE scores Frequently asked questions on PhD applications Chris Blattman.In short, focus on getting good recommendations, experience, grades and GRE scores.

As far as I can tell, most departments delegate admissions to a small committee of four to six faculty.

The committee probably changes every year.Thus you never know who will be on the committee or what they care about Who can do a recreation and leisure studies research proposal 100% original 14 days Platinum single spaced 66 pages / 18150 words.Thus you never know who will be on the committee or what they care about.If you think you don’t have what you need, but want a short, applied program designed to launch you into a top PhD program, consider the MACRM degree here at the Harris school.I personally take and train 1-2 students a year.

Some things that help, but that you may or may not be able to control at this point: Good grades. If you’re not at least an A- student it’s hard to make the case you are destined to teach or reach the research frontier.Economics applicants will want to have A’s in as many mathematics classes as possible.Night courses or an MA or MPA are common ways to make up for a patchy undergrad degree.

Note, though, many and perhaps most people we admit do not have an MA.The American PhD is designed for smart people to come with only undergraduate training.Strong letters of recommendation from professors.We like to see effusive letters from professors who know your coursework and research abilities well.This means that during or after your undergrad or MA you build relationships with two and ideally three faculty.

Non-academic letters are discounted, since they can seldom speak to your ability to do what a PhD expects of you: produce great research.Professors typically specify in their letter how and how long we have known you and often give a sense of ranking relative to previous students we have recommended.So: Have you developed close relationships yet with professors in the field where you want a PhD? Start now.Work as an RA, take small classes, and remember that it’s better to get a great letter from someone less known than an okay letter from a well-known scholar.

GRE scores in the 90-99 percentiles help a lot.Perhaps even worth retaking an exam for. Economists (and sustainable development PhDs) probably need 2-3 semesters of calculus and statistics each, plus real analysis and linear algebra.

Aspiring political scientists (except the theory/philosophy focused and some ethnographers) would be wise to do the same in calculus and statistics.Nine out of ten job market papers I see use quantitative theory or statistics to some extent, often inadequately.

The bar is rising rapidly and those with basic math foundations have advantages.This includes the ethnographers, who often want to do multi-method work, integrating insights from game theory or run regressions.If so, 4-8 classes of methods preparation in undergrad is the minimum to be literate in half the work in your field.Relevant or interesting work experience. Unless you want to be an abstract theorist, 1-2 years of work experience, ideally research experience, before applying, in order to better develop your research skills, explore your interests and understanding of the literature and write a compelling research statement.

I can’t speak for all schools, but each year I’ve served on admissions, most of the faculty on the committee discriminate against students that come straight from undergrad, at least in applied fields. Basically, you should be able to articulate a concrete research question and how you would propose to answer it. This won’t make a difference at all schools, but at many it can help.US students should apply for an NSF and foreign students may have a similar institution in their country.Very few applicants have all of these things.Even so stress out enough that you do now what you can to improve your chances with the time you have.A big piece of advice: Try to work on research projects with professors, because the best way to decide whether you want to do something is to try it out before it’s too late.Become an RA in your department, or start looking for RA jobs with professors in top departments in areas of your interest.This will also help with letters and your statement.

Thanks for the general advice, but what about you and Chicago? If you want to know what it’s like to work with me, read this.Most of the students I work with are interested in topics related to something under the umbrella of the political economy of development (micro- and macro-level), conflict and terrorism, political behavior (like voting or rioting or collective action), or causal inference.If your topic falls here, then I’d be a natural advisor for you, and I welcome new students.I commonly work with economics, politics and Harris School PhD students.Do I need to have faculty advisers picked out in advance? Yes and no.

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“Yes” because your personal statement should demonstrate that you are a good fit with the department.In your applicationsyou should be able to point to two to five faculty who, methodologically or topic-wise, do things that are relevant to you.The reason you want to identify multiple faculty is that we know things you do not: who has too many students already, who takes few students because they are solitary or retiring or on long leave, who has job offers elsewhere, etc Professional essay writers are the best helpers in creating a professional essay on any topic for you! ☆ 100% Custom Papers ☎ 24/7 Support ♛ HOT 40% OFF..The reason you want to identify multiple faculty is that we know things you do not: who has too many students already, who takes few students because they are solitary or retiring or on long leave, who has job offers elsewhere, etc.

So don’t make your application hinge on one faculty member.

Also, make sure the people you focus on are core faculty in the department, not adjuncts or someone in the law school, since these people seldom advise PhD students.

“No” because you think you know what you want to work on right now, but that will probably change three times.You haven’t learned much about the discipline yet, and it would be odd if two years of coursework and conversations didn’t change your mind.Also, “no” because it’s rare to have a relationship and any kind of commitment to or from a faculty member in advance.Most of us tend to let the admissions process run its course before getting involved.As a result, I don’t recommend contacting economics and political science professors in advance.

This is different than psychology or some of the humanities or sciences where you are expected to have a specific advisor and relationship in advance.The reason is that we may get 1000 applications and a small committee may make 60 offers for 20 spots.It would be almost impossible to meet and screen people personally, and the majority of faculty in the department may not be clsely involved in the admission process that year.Even so, we faculty can get bombarded by emails from prospective students in the months before applications are due.Different professors deal with this in different ways, and I am guessing a majority don’t respond at all.

I try to respond but only to explain that I engage in depth with students mainly after the committee has made offers.A word on personal statements I must say a little more about personal statements, because they often miss the point, and this is unhelpful and even painful to admissions committees.This is not an undergrad entry essay where you describe your life’s trails and tribulations.And please do not start with the story about an epiphany, such as the day that you knew you wanted to study the subject.Especially if it involves a child in a poor country.

In my opinion, this is mostly irrelevant and largely cliche.You are applying to be a professional researcher, and this is your cover letter.Personally, I like to see some of the following: Your fields of interest Who you would like to work with in the department and why this is a good fit Make sure they actually are there and take students–that is, that they didn’t leave last year, are actually in the department you are applying to, and are tenure-track or tenured Your career objective(s) Concrete research ideas (this seems to be more important in political science, which likes to see if you can develop an interesting research question and propose a way to answer it) Important highlights from your CV, including any strengths that distinguish you Only if necessary: Information that might help us understand any apparent weaknesses or puzzles in your application (e.why you studied physics but now are doing politics, or what happened in that single bad semester, or what your foreign GPA means) I’m pretty sure other professors will have different preferences here, so don’t take this as law.

I think we’d all agree, however, that we need to know whether you will fit into the department and with whom, and it’s helpful when you give your view.International students I have some sympathy here, coming from Canada.Even though it’s not that foreign, is foreign enough to create some hurdles in an already hurdle-strewn field.As far as I can tell, it’s hard to get into a US PhD program without a MA or MPA or the like from your country or the US.Like it or not, this seems to be a pattern.

If other profs disagree, let me know, because I’ll update this.This can even hold for the UK, Canada, etc.A lot of foreign recommendation letters, especially those outside Europe, say very little about how they know you, how long, where their institution ranks in the country in research, what they think of your relative quality, whether they’ve sent grad students to the US before and where, etc.This tends to be helpful information and if you can find a diplomatic way to see if your professors are aware of the US norms, the better for you.It’s also very hard for us to remember and track how every country grades their students.

I wish students would make it easier for us.If your registrar or an online site can convert your GPA, do so.At minimum, I’d suggest telling us what it means in your personal statement.I’m not sure about this, but I’d consider putting that conversion directly into the field online where it asks your GPA.Because many schools get from 1000 applications to the 200-300 they read in depth with a big spreadsheet of GPAs, GREs, school name, and a few other pieces of info.

A blank GPA field either raises or lowers the chance they look at your application, and I don’t know which.There’s no simple solution or recommendation here.But this is something I think applicants ought to know about.Comments and other perspectives welcome.I am also happy to entertain other questions.

First see my advice on the right sidebar about success and fulfillment in a PhD, including (for the idealists like me) how to still save the world.

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In Spring 2018 this class will offer a special focus on data analytics and information technologies in the contemporary world, as an exemplary case of science, technology, and society.The course provides an introduction to the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) as a way to study how our knowledge and technology shape and are shaped by social, political, historical, economic, and other factors.We will learn key concepts of the field (e Should i buy a custom recreation and leisure studies research proposal Custom writing 3 hours single spaced Junior.We will learn key concepts of the field (e.

, how technologies are understood and used differently in different communities) and explore how human values and technology can interact (e., how values are embedded in technical systems, shape the choices of their users, and pose ethical questions for their creators).This class has been proposed to meet the Human Contexts and Ethics requirement of the proposed Data Science major.

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This course explores the complex relationship between the two Koreas and Japan in the twentieth century nbd-dhofar.com/coursework/best-website-to-get-theological-studies-coursework-british-formatting-106-pages-29150-words.This course explores the complex relationship between the two Koreas and Japan in the twentieth century.Linked by trade, diplomacy, and cultural exchange, the Korean peninsula and the Japanese archipelago nevertheless share a fraught history characterized by imperialism, colonialism, violence and occupation.We will investigate fascinating puzzles that continue to vex the most accomplished historians, political scientists and sociologists today: How did a region poor in resources and largely isolated from the West emerge as one of economic vitality in the last hundred years? What have been the consequences of war, cataclysmic defeat, stalemate, division, and postwar economic resurgence? Why does Northeast Asia remain perhaps the only place in the world where the Cold War persists today? Assignments include evaluating movie trailers as pretend historical consultants, comparative analysis of news media on historical controversies over comfort women, textbooks, and commemoration, and close interrogation of primary source material.Active reading, short weekly responses, and two medium-length papers will help translate complex ideas into clear and workable essays.Our focus will be on reading historically, approaching texts critically, and fostering great writers whose prose will help them at the undergraduate level and beyond.

This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.What is capitalism, how did it develop in the United States, and how have historians studied it? These are the principal questions that will guide this course on the history of American capitalism from the colonial period to the Gilded Age.From the mud machines dredging Baltimore’s harbor to the coal mines of Colorado, we will survey a broad range of people and places to examine how they have shaped and been shaped by capitalism’s development.Though our focus will be on the economic history of the US, we will explore capitalism’s relationship to a variety of changes that defined American history during this period: territorial expansion, colonialism, slavery, urban development, industrialization, financial instability, the construction of race and gender, ecological transformation, and more.Throughout we will engage in an enduring debate about how to define capitalism: Is it best understood as a system of beliefs, a set of institutions, or a distinctive mode of economic production? To find answers, the course encourages you to think broadly about what constitutes capitalism by studying its historical trajectory.

This is a reading and writing intensive class, where you will develop your ability to think critically, read carefully, and write persuasively—skills essential for a variety of professional endeavors and for social and political engagement.But you will cultivate these skills in a specific way: by learning how to think historically and “do” history.Each week you will read historical scholarship and examine primary sources to develop your ability to interrogate arguments and make counterarguments, to sort and evaluate evidence, and to use evidence to interpret the past.This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.In order to conquer a territory, you should know where it is.

Yet the European colonization of the Americas started with profound geographic confusion: Christopher Columbus was hoping to reach Asia when he landed in the Caribbean.This course charts the connections between geographic knowledge and European efforts to colonize, conquer, and coexist with indigenous peoples in North America.We will use historic maps to explore encounters between Europeans and Native Americans from early Spanish, British and French colonial projects to the rise of the U., Mexico, and Canada as modern nation-states.

Students will study maps made by European explorers and Native Americans alike, and reflect on how humans approach cultural difference in the past and the present.The course will also explore maps as objects, the mapping of rivers and oceans, and the ways that maps reflect how diverse peoples in North America understood spaces, places, and themselves.Throughout the semester, students will work intensively on reading, interpreting, and writing about historical sources, through looking at maps, analyzing written primary sources, and reading a variety of historical literature.Students will develop reading skills for visual and textual sources, strategies of historical thinking and argumentation, and most importantly, strengthen their voices and techniques as writers through the creation of a scholarly research paper.Julia Lewandoski is a PhD Candidate in the History Department.

She is broadly interested in Native American History, Atlantic History, and the History of Science.Her dissertation compares indigenous land tenure during European imperial transitions in eighteenth and nineteenth century Quebec, Louisiana, and California.This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.Today we live in a world of self-proclaimed ‘republics’.But what exactly is republicanism? What are its sources? How has it passed down to our present age? This course offers an introduction to republicanism.

We will consider the relationship between republicanism and a number of crucial themes: liberty, virtue, law, the organization of and practice of political power, and commerce.Weekly seminars will involve close reading and discussion of primary and secondary literature.Our readings will take us from the foundations of republicanism in classical antiquity to its revival and transformation in the early modern period, culminating in the political revolutions of the eighteenth century.Although readings will engage heavily in political thought, this course remains above all a history course.This means that students must consider ideas as well as their social, economic, and political context.

The acquisition of historical knowledge is inseparable from the development of reading and writing skills.Engaging with primary and secondary sources, students will learn to identify topics, formulate relevant questions, and undertake independent research.Coursework will include a number of short written assignments and a final research paper.This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.

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What are the connections between play and work, play and everyday life? Where have Americans chosen to go for play, amusement, and relaxation? How did women and racial minorities carve out spaces of leisure during times of discrimination and segregation? How and why has that changed over time? This seminar will examine these questions by looking at the social history of recreation in the American City since 1850.

The primary focus will be on the settings for commercial leisure, including the activities, social relations, and ideas behind fairly well-known environments—such as theaters, bars and saloons, department stores, expositions, sports venues, amusement parks, cinemas, gambling, and vice districts.Non-commercial public spaces such as local and national parks, and community centers will also be investigated Who can help me with my college recreation and leisure studies research proposal American Business AMA Platinum.Non-commercial public spaces such as local and national parks, and community centers will also be investigated.

Related and overlapping issues will include the tensions between home leisure with familial supervision versus commercial leisure in public social settings; recreation’s role in the crossing of or reinforcement of lines between racial and ethnic groups, age cohorts, genders, and social classes; and, lastly, links between growing individual and personal freedom and cultures of leisure consumption.The aim of the seminar is to develop critical reading and writing skills.As part of our course you will read selected books, articles, and primary sources to understand how scholars conceive and argue about recreation and leisure.

The course will also serve as an introduction to historical research and will focus on the components of historical thinking: change over time, causality, context, complexity, and contingency best website to purchase a college liberal arts homework Formatting Vancouver Platinum.The course will also serve as an introduction to historical research and will focus on the components of historical thinking: change over time, causality, context, complexity, and contingency.The first half of the class will require students to write brief essays focused on developing these basic skills best website to purchase a college liberal arts homework Formatting Vancouver Platinum.The first half of the class will require students to write brief essays focused on developing these basic skills.At the end of the course students will demonstrate their mastery of the various components of historical thinking in a clearly written essay.This course satisfies the Pre-Modern Requirement for the History Major.

This course offers a broad introduction to the European Middle Ages through both textual and material sources.

Change — as an individual experience and as a social phenomenon — is a central theme.Why did medieval people make radical changes in their lives? Why did European political systems, cultural expressions, and religious ideals change so dramatically over the course of the Middle Ages? The course charts the emergence of a distinctively “medieval” civilization after the demise in the west of the late Roman state and then the transformation of this early medieval civilization after the millennium.The roles of demographic and economic expansion are explored as motors for the radical political, religious, and cultural transformation of medieval society from 1000 to 1500.This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.What is foreign policy, who makes it, and to what avail? This freshman seminar, “Making U.

Foreign Policy,” will introduce students to the study of U.The course will assess the institutional and bureaucratic dimensions of foreign policy, beginning with the Constitution and the organization of the American government for the conduct and implementation of foreign policy.

Readings will consider the evolving international context for foreign policy, the utility of strategy, and the particular challenges the United States faces as the world’s dominant superpower.The course will offer an introduction to academic disciplines and methods for studying foreign policy and international relations more broadly.Students will also explore and engage campus resources, including visiting speakers from the professional foreign policy community.This course does not count for credit toward the History Major but may fulfill other requirements.Scheduled to meet for the first half of the semester only, this once-a-week two-hour seminar will analyze documentaries that explore and expose the endangerment of children and youth in Africa.

Documentaries on child trafficking and enslavement, child brides, child laborers, street children and youth, victims of FGM, child soldiers, HIV/AIDS orphans and urban youth gangs will be viewed in class.The goal of the seminar is to examine the complex local, regional, and at times global factors behind the extensive abuse and endangerment of children and youth in Africa.In order to historicize and contextualize the study, we shall, in addition to the documentaries, refer to a limited number of published articles.Class #: 41216 Is it the end of the world as we know it and do we feel fine!? Our seminar explores apocalyptic beliefs and hope for the end of the world in the early modern Atlantic world and/or the desire for the transformation of the world and society—a yearning for a future egalitarian world led by a savior figure.We will examine topics such as the history of apocalyptic ideas and millenarian traditions, early modern movements in Iberia, France and England, millenarian hopes for the New World, colonial dreams and rebellions, and nineteenth century undertakings from Brazil (Juzeiro and Canudos) to the United States (Millerites).

This course is concerned broadly with the relationship between the categories of ‘religion’ and ‘politics’; and the practices of violence which lie at their intersection; and in particular with rethinking the terms we use to imagine religious violence in the past and the present.As a case study, we will explore ways of conceptualizing the longue dur e history of the relationship between Hinduism and Islam in the Indian subcontinent over the last millennium.Through reading a mix of postcolonial historical scholarship and precolonial primary sources, we will critically investigate the Islamic conquest of India; the historic evolution of the concept of ‘Hindu’ and ‘Muslim’; the profound fissure of the partition of India in 1947; and the evolving politics of memory in the twentieth century.No prior experience with the history of India is required for this class.People learn best when they learn together.

That premise underpins all our activities at Berkeley.Berkeley Connect seeks to enhance learning by strengthening contacts between undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty outside of the classroom.We invite you to connect with undergraduates, graduates and faculty in lively conversation about history and the Berkeley experience.Ask the questions you’ve always wanted to ask.

Learn about the practice of history, and explore the Berkeley campus with a dedicated mentor.Discover a new Berkeley! The core of the Berkeley Connect program is a one-credit, pass-fail course that is designed to create a community of students with similar intellectual interests.There is no homework associated with Berkeley Connect: no exams, no papers, no quizzes.Berkeley Connect links undergraduate students with experienced mentors in History through small groups of 10-20 students that meet regularly.Small group meetings help students share ideas and learn new skills, as well as foster friendships and provide a supportive intellectual community.

Participants will also meet with mentors one-on-one for academic guidance and advice.The only requirement for joining Berkeley Connect is that you have an interest in the field of study.You do not have to be a major in order to participate! Undeclared freshmen and sophomores are welcome, along with entering junior transfers and juniors and seniors.

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This course satisfies the American Cultures Requirement.When President Calvin Coolidge declared in 1925 that “the chief business of the American people is business,” he was not making a historical argument, though it would have been a defensible one.

Nearly a century earlier, French visitor, Alexis de Tocqueville, made a similar observation Holland CV College of Health and Human Performance University nbsp.Nearly a century earlier, French visitor, Alexis de Tocqueville, made a similar observation.

Indeed, America was colonized by joint-stock corporations! Understanding the history of American business can therefore unlock a great deal about America itself.How did capital exchange become capitalism and how did capitalism affect American lives? How have capitalist markets been constructed socially and legally? What has been the historical relationship between capitalism and gender, race, freedom, and inequality? We will explore these questions on a chronological journey from seventeenth-century cotton trading to twenty-first century foreclosure.In this course we will examine the fascinating, competing histories and cultures of the Baltic coast city known variously as Danzig and Gda sk (among other spellings and forms).First a medieval Slavic (Polish/Kashubian) fishing village, then a growing port city under the rule of the Teutonic Knights of the Cross (XIV century), then the largest city of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (XV century to 1795) write me a dentistry thesis proposal MLA Business 69 pages / 18975 words.

First a medieval Slavic (Polish/Kashubian) fishing village, then a growing port city under the rule of the Teutonic Knights of the Cross (XIV century), then the largest city of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (XV century to 1795).

Freed from the hated overlordship of the Teutonic Order and, as the chief city of Royal Prussia (a semi-autonomous district of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth), Gda sk (still largely German speaking and a Hanseatic city) was Poland’s main access to the wider world through export and import.Except for a brief period of intendant status as, once again, a “Free City” in Napoleonic times (1807–1814), from 1795 (the Third Partition of Poland) to 1918 (end of WWI), Danzig was a city of diminished significance in the Kingdom of Prussia and later the German Empire.In the twentieth century, it became a focal point of German-Polish tensions.The Treaty of Versailles (1918) did many things: among them it created a “Free State (not “City”) of Gda sk,” governed (loosely) by the League of Nations; it also resurrected a free and independent Second Polish Republic, still a multi-ethnic federation, but with much changed borders, and with a promise of “free and secure access to the sea.

” As longstanding metaphors in American history and culture, “Wall Street” and “Main Street” typically refer to streets that intersect at right angles and places that represent the antithesis of each other.

In this rendering, Wall Street is home to nefarious big banks and greedy financiers, while Main Street is home to wholesome “mom-and-pop” shops patronized by ordinary people of modest means.What’s good for one is not good for the other.This course, which will be co-taught by a historian and corporate law professor, will examine critical junctures in the intersection of Wall Street and Main Street in American history and culture, how and why Wall Street and Main Street have been understood to point in opposite directions, the extent to which that understanding makes sense, and how and why the relationship between Wall Street and Main Street has evolved over time.This course aims to provide a nuanced historical understanding of the history of family, gender, and sexuality in the Middle East (here defined as the Arab world, Turkey, and Iran), from the pre-Islamic period to the present day.The course begins with the origins of Islamic norms of gender and family in the late-antique Arabian Peninsula, setting the stage for later challenges and interpretations.

We will then move chronologically and thematically to consider such topics as the role of households in the growth of pre-modern states, western representations of the “oriental woman,” and the politicization of sexual identities in the modern age.Throughout the course, we will put legal and social norms in conversation with the complex fluidity of men and women’s lived experiences.In examining the role of women in society and politics, shifting attitudes towards pleasure and same-sex relations, and the powerful variety of family and kinship structures underpinning everything from war and sovereignty to social and economic reproduction, the course seeks to add texture and nuance to the study of a region generally associated with conflict and repression.As it recovered from one of the most devastating epidemics in world history, Europe in 1400 was a patchwork of wealth and poverty, law and disorder, urban enclaves and vast peasant hinterlands.Whatever unity it had depended on an inheritance from the Roman empire, above all a Church whose institutions gave a semblance of order and coherence to this heterogeneous continent.

Over the next 600 years, "Christendom" would give way to a host of new Christianities; this Europe would give way to political and cultural forms collectively if vaguely called "the West." And one of the chief products of this transformation was the emergence of something called "religion," understood to be somehow distinct from other realms of experience and power such as "society" or "the state." This class charts this epochal transformation, paying special attention to the violent expansion of Europe to the Americas, the conflicts attending the European Reformation, the history of the missions, the development of sects and denominations, the theory and practice of toleration, the emergence of modern secularism, as well as the challenge of religious minorities in modern America and Europe.This course satisfies the Pre-Modern Requirement for the History Major.At the end of the Peloponnesian War, some of Athens’ enemies proposed that the great city, now starved into defeat, should be razed to the ground and turned into pastureland for sheep.

So dramatic a reversal, so severe a punishment, was unthinkable to most Greeks even in the heated moment of their unexpected victory, and the proposal was not approved.It remains, however, indicative of a major turning-point in Greek history and will serve as our point of departure.This course will explore the changing face of the Greek world in the late Classical period, an age of political experiment and struggle for hegemony; the conquests of Alexander the Great in the late fourth century and the Hellenistic world of the kings and dynasts who fought their way to power after his death; and the process by which Rome, nothing more than a little Italian city-state at the beginning of this period, was drawn into the eastern Mediterranean and came to conquer the entire Greek world.Other topics will include cultural interactions between Greeks and their non-Greek neighbors, including Persians, Indians, Jews, Egyptians, and Romans; kings; cities, civic identity, and civic benefactors; federalism; religious change; economic growth and practices; mercenaries and pirates; warfare; patronage of the arts; and major developments in science, mathematics, and philosophy.Readings are assigned on a weekly basis, and must be completed before your section meeting for the week in which they are assigned.

There will be two short papers (5-7pp), bi-weekly online quizzes, a two-part midterm, and a cumulative final exam.Here we will deal with the history of South Asia between the coming of the Europeans and the present.It will be organized around a series of contested formulations about the recent South Asian past.One of these problems is: how was India comprehended and manipulated by the Europeans? The second problem is: How was India conquered, by the sword or by the word? The third is: How did Indians resist the British? Finally, how was the voice of women, lower classes, and others expressed and heard? We will read books about language, gender, the "subaltern" classes, and women in an attempt to understand these questions.The general theme of this course is Japan's emergence as a world power in its two phases, military and economic.

Our chief concern will be with the experience within Japan of that emergence and its consequences: the impact on farming villages (including colonial villages sending labor migrants to Japan) of "late" industrialization; the emergence of a conflict, played out in actual lives, between notions of individuality vs.collective identity (based on class, nationality, and gender) and between different collective identities; the horror of total war; the transformation of values that came with defeat and occupation; the nature of postwar democracy and relation of society to state; the changing way(s) in which Japanese view and participate in the world outside Japan.This course satisfies the American Cultures Requirement.This course examines the United States from roughly 1812 to 1860.Although historians have designated this period antebellum ‘before’ + ‘war’ in reference to the Civil War that began in 1861, war was by no means inevitable to people who lived in the United States in the preceding decades.

The first half of the nineteenth century was indeed shaped enormously by slavery, but the daily lives of ordinary Americans were also affected by many institutions that, in contrast to slavery, feel profoundly modern: mass media, capitalism, work performed for wages, and the two-party political system.This class will explore the life, culture, economy, and politics of an era that saw the development of many of the characteristics we associate with modern living in the United States.We will examine race relations, popular culture, class formation, gender roles, urbanization, immigration, territorial expansion, democratic politics, religious experience, and popular science.

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Crucially, we will also probe the limits and fault lines of these national ideas and institutions, paying particular attention to the role of race, ethnicity, class, and region in shaping men and women’s opportunities and experiences.Assigned readings will be composed primarily of personal narratives written during the antebellum era.

This course satisfies the American Cultures Requirement He's even a little more emphatic than that: “Economics is the best PhD you can possibly get.”   Unless you want to be an abstract theorist, 1-2 years of work experience, ideally research experience, before applying, in order to better develop your research   If your registrar or an online site can convert your GPA, do so..This course satisfies the American Cultures Requirement.

Immediately prior to World War II, the US military ranked 17th in the world, most African-Americans lived in the rural south and were barred from voting, culture and basic science in the United States enjoyed no world-wide recognition, most married women did not work for wages, and the census did not classify most Americans as middle-class or higher.This course will explore these and other transformations, all part of the making of modern America 13 Mar 2017 - Responsible for teaching three courses per year including graduate and undergraduate courses in RPTS and Youth Development Program. • Direct research agenda focusing on analyzing issues associated with RPTS and Youth. Development. • Prepare grant proposals for internal and external sources to  .This course will explore these and other transformations, all part of the making of modern America.We will take care to analyze the events, significance and cost of US ascendancy to world power in an international and domestic context.

This course satisfies the American Cultures Requirement.Though there are many ways to imagine a nation (a land, a polity, an ethnic group, a culture), America has also been identified, since its inception, with the process and prospect of people arriving from elsewhere nbd-dhofar.com/presentation/should-i-buy-environmental-studies-presentation-custom-writing-single-spaced-3-hours-100-plagiarism-free.Though there are many ways to imagine a nation (a land, a polity, an ethnic group, a culture), America has also been identified, since its inception, with the process and prospect of people arriving from elsewhere.This course surveys the history of the United States between 1790 and 2001 through the lens of immigration and from the perspective of immigrants.As we follow this tumultuous story, we will pursue three related inquiries: Who moved to the United States from beyond its jurisdiction, under what circumstances, and with what consequences for them and their children? (the social history of American immigration) What laws, court cases, and other uses of state power encouraged and constrained the arrival of newcomers from particular parts of the world? What attitudes toward citizenship and national borders shaped these developments? (the political history of American immigration policy) How have race, ethnicity, and national origin been constructed and defined over the course of this history, and how have attitudes toward those categories reflected and influenced the patterns and experiences of immigration? (the cultural history of racial and ethnic difference) Course requirements include two short writing assignments, two in-class exams, and a cumulative examination during finals week.In order to understand the modern world, one must understand early modern Britain.

Why did nation states develop from feudal kingdoms? Why did economic relations get restructured into what is now understood of as capitalism and why does that system seem so intransigent? Why did differences in skin color become justification for enslavement? Why are political hopes seemingly forever caught in a tension between the pessimism that human relations are naturally bent toward a “war of all against all” and the optimism of securing “life, liberty, and the pursuit of property” for everyone universally? Why are all of the course descriptions on this website written in English here at a university situated on the crest of the Pacific Ocean? Modernity could have been many different things, but it unexpectedly turned out to be British.Throughout this semester, students will engage with the social, economic, political, cultural, and religious histories of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland from roughly 1485 to 1750.Those histories include religious reformation, global exploration, political revolution, social stratification, science, magic, and intellectual enlightenment, among many others.Our studies will take us field-by-field through emerald shires, to the stuffy and severe corridors of Whitehall, and bounding along the salted seas.

We will study everyday life and people who wore utterly ludicrous wigs.

Since this is an advanced history course, students will be expected to read deeply, complete frequent writing assignments, take exams, and write a research paper in addition to attending lectures and participating in class discussion.This course satisfies the Pre-Modern Requirement for the History Major.This course will examine the profound economic, social, and spiritual changes that occurred in Western Europe during the High and Late Middle Ages.The themes to be explored include the Crusades (the 7th Crusade of Louis IX and perhaps the 4th Crusade, which ended not in the Holy Land but with the conquest of Constantinople), inquisitions and heresy (the Cathars), the radicalization of the Franciscans, the quality of the papacy's religious leadership, law courts and justice, the acceleration of commercial activity, the transformation of lay piety, and above all the polarization of understandings of “gender.” Readings are largely from primary sources.

The format is mostly discussion woven into informal lectures.Requirements are a midterm, a final, and regular reader-response exercises.Depending on enrollment, one or two short (3-5 pp.) papers may be required; if so, then one or both exams will be shortened, the papers effectively replacing one of the exam questions.If papers are assigned, they will require an in-depth analysis of one of the primary sources read.

Fascism was a form of rule created in Europe in the 1920s, when world communism was rising and liberalism steeply declining, when racist thinking pervaded all politics, and fears of decadence and secularization and loss of status melded within a rhetoric of the "people" and its sacred rights.Early fascists comprised a movement of a new quality, promoting salvation through recovery of lost wholeness.They enacted politics through violent and confident self-assertion of a "leader" and uniformed followers.Fascism is a crucial subject to understanding the modern world.It was a break with all forms of political organization known to that point, and travelled speedily across national boundaries, to find representation in every European state west of the soviet Union.

Yet it prospered very differently by place -- strong in Romania, weak in Poland -- and came to power only in Germany and Italy, and form there transformed our world, with destructive energies that were unprecedented, revealing the ultimate consequences of an ideology based in racial supremacy.The course surveys all aspects of this movement, from intellectual origins in 19th century bourgeois Europe and World War I, through the extreme experience of WWII, and the question why fascist movements seized power in certain states but not others.We study how fascist regimes, once in power, cultivated popular support and legitimacy; how they developed their own systems of economics, aesthetics, science, and race; and how these regimes shaped the everyday lives of their subjects; and how they radicalized with the onset of war.We conclude by moving closer to the present and asking what of fascism remains in our contemporary world, as memory and practice.Unfortunately, the topic is of continued relevance.

The twentieth century saw unprecedented levels of international economic growth through market exchange and integration, as well as numerous experiments, left and right, at economic independence from reigning financial superpowers.National governments and the international organizations they created alternatively relied on market mechanisms and on expert planning to spur economic growth, raising the living standards of millions in some instances, but also fueling mass unemployment, famine, environmental degradation and even war in other instances.Topics include the gold standard, the Great Depression, the economics of the two World Wars, the rise and fall of the postwar welfare state, the problem of economic development, and the recent return of financial crises.There are no prerequisites, although a background in economics is useful.This course offers a survey of the main historical developments in the (two) Netherlands from the middle ages to the present day.

Its main focus will be on the early modern era, traditionally considered as the ‘Golden Age’ of the emerging Dutch Republic and the ‘Dark Age’ for the remaining Spanish Habsburg Netherlands.Even so, Rembrandt and Rubens thrived in equally fascinating global empires.The course will focus on several questions of historical interpretation, such as the meaning of the Dutch Revolt, the impact of religion and economy and the making of the Dutch and Spanish world empires.It particularly investigates the questions of existing, emerging and disappearing borders and barriers reconfiguring the many polities along the North Sea.

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While offering a transregional perspective, it also situates these developments in their wider European and global contexts.

This course introduces students to Russian intellectual history from the end of the eighteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth century, covering aspects of political, social, and religious will observe Russian thinkers elaborate conceptions of nationalism in a multi-ethnic empire, trying to resolve the eternal question of Russia's national identity: whether it belongs to the East or West? Next, we will move on to social thought, including debates on serfdom, populism, the "women question," the nature of progress, and the rise of Marxism.Finally, we will study debates on religion: the pertinence of Orthodox Christian faith in social and philosophical thought, including early twentieth century religious rebuttals to Marx Where do modern science and technology come from? How and why do they change? How is their credibility established — or challenged — in modern societies? How do they interact with the rest of our culture? The course examines these and other related questions using historical case studies from different periods Essays are also a staple of architecture degrees, as are frequent site visits to important buildings and places of architectural interest. Those who study architecture at undergraduate level will graduate in three to four years with a BA or BSc depending on the program. In the UK this bachelor's qualification will usually include  .Finally, we will study debates on religion: the pertinence of Orthodox Christian faith in social and philosophical thought, including early twentieth century religious rebuttals to Marx Where do modern science and technology come from? How and why do they change? How is their credibility established — or challenged — in modern societies? How do they interact with the rest of our culture? The course examines these and other related questions using historical case studies from different periods.

We shall discuss the emergence of science as a defining dimension of modernity, and its relations to other cultural traditions such as magic, religion, and art.We shall pay particular attention to the evolution of artifacts and technological systems such as industrial machinery, weapons, computers, and contraceptives How to order an research proposal recreation and leisure studies Harvard 95 pages / 26125 words 4 days Custom writing.We shall pay particular attention to the evolution of artifacts and technological systems such as industrial machinery, weapons, computers, and contraceptives.The aim of the course is for you to learn about how science and technology shape the way we live and, especially, how they are invariably shaped by historical and social circumstances How to order an research proposal recreation and leisure studies Harvard 95 pages / 26125 words 4 days Custom writing.

The aim of the course is for you to learn about how science and technology shape the way we live and, especially, how they are invariably shaped by historical and social circumstances.

At the end of the course, you will be able to think historically about science and technology, and thus engage effectively with questions of technoscientific change — or lack thereof.The course draws approaches and materials from both STEM and the social sciences.Throughout, we emphasize historical development.Scientific ideas and technological artifacts are not timeless, and they did not drop from the sky.A main course goal is to practice thinking historically; assignments and examinations call on those skills.

The course is aimed at students of all majors; no scientific knowledge is presupposed.Running parallel to History 182A is History 182T, intended for students interested in teaching elementary or secondary school science and math.Students in the "T" course will attend the regular 182A lectures and a special section; this section will focus on techniques, skills, and perspectives necessary to apply the history of science in the juvenile and adolescent science classroom, including pedagogy, devising lesson plans for their classrooms, finding reliable historical information, and writing.History 182T satisfies a requirement for the Cal Teach minor and counts toward a State of California teaching credential.If you are interested in History 182T, please contact Jessica Jones ([email protected] ): Cal Teach enrollment starts in mid-October with Phase I enrollment for Spring 2018.

This course satisfies the Pre-Modern Requirement for the History Major.The course deals with the origins of Christianity and the first eleven centuries of its expansion into a major institutional, social, and intellectual force shaping Western Europe.The central themes are the mechanisms and conditions shaping this expansion, rather than a chronological account in order to present this process as a model of institutionalization of religious movements.The emphasis will be on patterns of crisis and reform; i.

, on conflicts arising within the church itself and as a result of its dealings with the "outside" world, and how these crises were resolved.The course is based on the study of primary sources and will include problems of historical method.Whether you call it soccer, football or futebol the beautiful game with the round ball is played and watched around the world.This class will explore how and why that came to happen.Along the way it will trace key developments in the game such as the formation of clubs, international tournaments, the development of stadiums, fan culture, media coverage, formations and styles of play, gambling and corruption, the working conditions and wages of players.

Although I am a massive fan the point of the class is not to nerd out but to locate these changes in broader historical processes – political, economic, social and cultural - that have transformed the game and made it a global commodity.Ideally the class will teach you both a lot about the game and about thinking historically and how the world changes over time.There will be a mid-term (30%) and a final exam (40%) with in-class notes allowed.Section participation will account for the other 30% of the final grade.The class will be administered through a bcourse site and the hashtag #GlobalSoccer101 will be used to share additional materials.

People learn best when they learn together.That premise underpins all our activities at Berkeley.Berkeley Connect seeks to enhance learning by strengthening contacts between undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty outside of the classroom.We invite you to connect with undergraduates, graduates and faculty in lively conversation about history and the Berkeley experience.Ask the questions you’ve always wanted to ask.Learn about the practice of history, and explore the Berkeley campus with a dedicated mentor.Discover a new Berkeley! The core of the Berkeley Connect program is a one-credit, pass-fail course that is designed to create a community of students with similar intellectual interests.There is no homework associated with Berkeley Connect: no exams, no papers, no quizzes.Berkeley Connect links undergraduate students with experienced mentors in History through small groups of 10-20 students that meet regularly.

Small group meetings help students share ideas and learn new skills, as well as foster friendships and provide a supportive intellectual community.Participants will also meet with mentors one-on-one for academic guidance and advice.The only requirement for joining Berkeley Connect is that you have an interest in the field of study.You do not have to be a major in order to participate! Undeclared freshmen and sophomores are welcome, along with entering junior transfers and juniors and seniors.For 198BC, Section 1 (Tuesdays, 5-6): Use Class #17140 For 198BC, Section 2 (Tuesdays, 6-7): Use Class #17138